Teachers

Department for Education written question – answered on 21st November 2022.

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Photo of Bridget Phillipson Bridget Phillipson Shadow Secretary of State for Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of teachers who qualified in each year from 2010-2020 were still in service in the English state school sector (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five, (f) six, (g) seven, (h) eight, (i) nine, (j) ten and (k) eleven years after qualifying by (i) region and (ii) local authority.

Photo of Bridget Phillipson Bridget Phillipson Shadow Secretary of State for Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many full time equivalent (a) deferred newly qualified and (b) newly qualified entrants there were to the state school sector in England between 2011-12 and 2021-22, by (i) region and (ii) local authority.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

Information on the retention rates of qualified teachers and the number of newly qualified entrants to state funded schools in England is published in the annual ‘School Workforce in England’ national statistics release. The information can be accessed at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

87.5% of teachers who qualified in 2020 were still teaching one year after qualification. In the year to November 2021, the full time equivalent of 43,981 teachers joined the state-funded sector in England, including 3,850 deferred newly qualified teachers and 22,059 newly qualified teachers.

The requested figures by region and local authority are in the attached tables. Figures relate to a teacher’s original location, which is not necessarily the location they were in when leaving the state funded sector. If a teacher moves to a state funded school in a different local authority or region, they are counted as still in service. One-year retention rates will be the least affected by movement across boundaries. Retention percentages may go up as well as down because the methodology employed allows for non-continuous service where teachers leave and re-join the state funded sector over time.

86460 86461 Table (xlsx, 208.9KB)

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