Department for Work and Pensions: Staff

Department for Work and Pensions written question – answered on 23rd September 2022.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Marsha de Cordova Marsha de Cordova Labour, Battersea

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much her Department has spent on staffing costs for (a) mandatory reconsideration and (b) appeals against Work Capability Assessment decisions for Universal Credit in each year since 2012-13.

Photo of Victoria Prentis Victoria Prentis The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

Universal Credit cost data cannot be broken down into specific case types (i.e. Work Capability Assessment) so total costs from all UC Reconsiderations and Appeals has been provided.

The information for the financial years covered by the request are detailed in the tables below:

Universal Credit

2012-13

(£m)

2013-14

(£m)

2014-15

(£m)

2015-16

(£m)

2016-17

(£m)

2017-18

(£m)

2018-19

(£m)

2019-20

(£m)

2020-21

(£m)

2021-22

(£m)

Mandatory Reconsiderations

£0.0

£0.0

£0.2

£0.8

£1.1

£4.1

£4.4

£9.3

£11.5

£14.1

Appeals

£0.0

£0.0

£0.0

£0.1

£0.2

£1.1

£1.7

£5.7

£5.6

£5.4

Cost figures are rounded to the nearest £0.1m

Data Source: ABM

The cost figures quoted are estimated DWP level 1 operating costs, including both directdelivery staff and non-staff costs. Non-staff costs are only those costs incurred in local cost centres, relating to direct delivery staff.

Please note that the data supplied is from the Departmental Activity Based Models. This data is derived from unpublished management information, which was collected for internalDepartmental use only, and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official

Statistics publication standards. It should therefore be treated with caution. The Departmental Activity Based staffing models are a snapshot of how many people were identified asundertaking specified activities as assigned by line managers.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.