Road Traffic Offences: Greater London

Department for Transport written question – answered at on 14 September 2022.

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Photo of Matthew Offord Matthew Offord Conservative, Hendon

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate his Department has made of the amount of money levied by local authorities in London through penalties incurred by motorists entering Low Traffic Networks.

Photo of Matthew Offord Matthew Offord Conservative, Hendon

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the appropriateness of local authorities in London using Low Traffic Networks to raise revenue from fines.

Photo of Robert Courts Robert Courts Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)

‘Low-traffic neighbourhoods’ have been around for many years but have only recently become known by this name. It describes a collection of measures designed to remove rat-running traffic from streets. The key feature is generally a road closure, which prevents through motor traffic from accessing the road but permits cycling and walking. Access is maintained for residents and their visitors and for essential services.

Closures may be implemented using existing standard traffic management measures such as signed access restrictions to through motor traffic. These are enforceable in the same way and with the same penalties as when used on any other part of the road network. Enforcement of such restrictions is a matter for local authorities, where they have taken up the powers, and as such the Department has made no such estimate of the penalties incurred.

The use of any surplus funds resulting from civil enforcement of such traffic restrictions in London is subject to the requirements set out in Schedule 2 to the London Local Authorities and Transport for London Act 2003, which ring-fences how any surplus may be used.

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