Airports: Air Traffic Control

Department for Transport written question – answered on 28th July 2022.

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Photo of Lord Soley Lord Soley Labour

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether either the (1) Civil Aviation Authority, or (2) individual airport air traffic control systems, have responsibility for recording details of flight delays and cancellations.

Photo of Lord Soley Lord Soley Labour

To ask Her Majesty's Government how disputes between airlines and air traffic control systems over the reasons for delays and cancellations are recorded.

Photo of Lord Soley Lord Soley Labour

To ask Her Majesty's Government how a (1) passenger, or (2) other member of the public, can identify whether (a) an airline, or (b) air traffic control, are responsible for the delay or cancellation of a flight.

Photo of Lord Soley Lord Soley Labour

To ask Her Majesty's Government how a passenger whose flight has been delayed or cancelled can ascertain whether that cancellation or delay has been caused by air traffic control problems.

Photo of Baroness Vere of Norbiton Baroness Vere of Norbiton Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)

Under the Civil Aviation Act 2012, airports report to the CAA punctuality of flights. This data is collated and published on the CAA’s website on a monthly basis.

In addition, airlines, airports and air traffic providers also input delays and the reason for delays into the EUROCONTROL system, as part of a well-established and accepted industry process.

Passengers’ rights are primary and when passengers are delayed or face cancellations, they deserve explanations and refunds.

Passengers have the ability to claim for delayed and cancelled flights through UK261. Through this process they are able to request an Air Traffic Control (ATC) statement, that will outline any ATC delays their flight experienced.

Moreover, if passengers feel they have not received adequate details from their airline, they are able to raise this with either the CAA’s Passenger Advice and Complaint’s Team (PACT) or with the Alternative Dispute Resolution scheme approved by the CAA.

On 17 July, the Secretary of State announced the new Aviation Passenger Charter which helps passengers understand their rights and responsibilities, including when there is disruption.

We continue to be clear that any delays and cancellations should be avoided by the aviation sector but when these happen, and passengers are affected they should be in a position to rightly claim refunds or compensation.

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