Reoffenders

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 29th June 2022.

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Photo of Ellie Reeves Ellie Reeves Shadow Minister (Justice)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of prisoners who are released from prison reoffend, broken down by (a) offence and (b) ethnicity, including the proportion of offenders of each ethnicity.

Photo of Kit Malthouse Kit Malthouse The Minister of State, Home Department, The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice, Minister of State (Ministry of Justice and Home Office)

This Government is tackling the causes of reoffending to make our streets safer. We are investing in probation services and new initiatives to reduce reoffending and beat crime.

The Prisons Strategy White Paper, published in December 2021, sets out our ambitious plans to reduce reoffending. We will spend £200 million a year by 2024/25 to improve prison leavers’ access to accommodation, employment support and substance misuse treatment, and on further measures for early intervention to tackle youth offending. This builds on £70 million of investment in 2021 to tackle drivers of reoffending.

Our measures are working. Overall proven reoffending has decreased from 30.9% in 2009/10 to 25.6% in 2019/20. The reoffending rates for index offences of robbery, possession of weapons, criminal damage and arson, and sexual and drug offences have all fallen between 2009/10 and 2019/20.

The proportion of individuals (adults and juveniles) released from custody who subsequently went on to reoffend over a one-year follow-up period are presented in the table below. The figures are broken down by index offence and ethnicity.

Table 1: Overall proven reoffending data for offenders released from custody, by index offence and ethnicity, April 2019 to March 2020 annual offender cohort

Index offence

Proportion of offenders who reoffend (%)

Violence against the person

36.5%

White

38.4%

Black

29.2%

Asian

29.6%

Other

20.6%

Not recorded

24.0%

Sexual

10.9%

White

10.7%

Black

18.0%

Asian

9.0%

Other

14.7%

Not recorded

4.9%

Robbery

26.1%

White

26.3%

Black

26.1%

Asian

25.9%

Other

*

Not recorded

20.9%

Theft

63.4%

White

63.8%

Black

64.5%

Asian

55.2%

Other

45.7%

Not recorded

56.3%

Criminal damage and arson

24.5%

White

24.4%

Black

*

Asian

*

Other

*

Not recorded

*

Drug

21.0%

White

21.0%

Black

22.8%

Asian

19.9%

Other

10.6%

Not recorded

13.2%

Possession of weapons

42.2%

White

43.5%

Black

39.9%

Asian

38.4%

Other

39.6%

Not recorded

32.0%

Public order

56.1%

White

57.3%

Black

51.7%

Asian

49.3%

Other

*

Not recorded

47.1%

Miscellaneous crimes against society

27.9%

White

30.9%

Black

26.2%

Asian

18.4%

Other

6.8%

Not recorded

15.0%

Fraud

31.0%

White

35.5%

Black

25.7%

Asian

15.3%

Other

*

Not recorded

7.2%

Summary non-motoring

56.9%

White

58.3%

Black

51.9%

Asian

46.7%

Other

*

Not recorded

44.7%

Summary motoring

36.0%

White

37.9%

Black

30.1%

Asian

29.4%

Other

*

Not recorded

20.0%

Other

*

White

*

Black

*

Asian

*

Other

*

Not recorded

*

Total

42.2%

White

44.6%

Black

36.3%

Asian

30.7%

Other

23.1%

Not recorded

28.3%

Notes:

  1. Annual figures are produced by aggregating the four preceding 3-monthly cohorts. Please note that this may result in a single offender being included in the annual cohort more than once.
  2. Proven reoffences are measured over a one-year follow-up period and a further six-month waiting period to allow for offences to be proven in court. It is worth noting that the reoffending follow-up and waiting periods for the April 2019 to March 2020 annual offender cohort overlaps, to varying degrees, with the first, second and third national lockdowns due as a result of the COVID19 pandemic. Due to this, figures relating to this cohort period should be interpreted with caution.
  3. Index offence refers to the proven offence that led to an offender being included in the cohort.
  4. Ethnicity categories presented are based on the reporting police officers' perception of the offender's ethnicity which is entered onto the Police National Computer and not self-reported.
  5. Where offender counts are less than or equal to 5, data have been suppressed to avoid deductive disclosure. In addition, proven reoffending proportions based on less than 30 offenders are also removed as they make data unreliable for interpretation. In both instances, counts and/or proportions are marked as *.
  6. Due to how custodial sentences are recorded, offenders with prison sentence lengths of one day are not included.

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