State Retirement Pensions: Females

Treasury written question – answered on 12th November 2021.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Allan Dorans Allan Dorans Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Foreign Affairs Team Member), Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Policing)

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of changes to the state pension age for women born in the 1950s on revenue accruing to the Exchequer from (a) income tax, (b) national insurance, (c) VAT and (d) other fiscal sources.

Photo of Simon Clarke Simon Clarke The Chief Secretary to the Treasury

No such estimate has been made of the effect of changes to the state pension age for women born in the 1950s on revenue accruing to the Exchequer.

The Government decided over 25 years ago that it was going to make the State Pension age the same for men and women.

Raising State Pension age in line with life expectancy changes has been the policy of successive administrations over many years

DWP estimate that the total additional cost if we had not implemented any increases in State Pension age would be in the region of £215bn for the period 2010/11 to 2025/26, in 2018/19 prices. This figure takes into account State Pension, other pensioner benefits, and savings made on .working age benefits.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No95 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.