Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species: Musical Instruments

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs written question – answered on 12th November 2020.

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Photo of The Earl of Clancarty The Earl of Clancarty Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce procedures for the inspection of materials protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora when transporting musical instruments between Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1 January 2021.

Photo of Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park The Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)

After the Transition Period, controls implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will apply to the movement of CITES specimens between Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI). This is as a result of our international obligations under CITES, and the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol. Such movement between NI and GB will require CITES documentation, for example import and export permits or a Musical Instrument Certificate. All CITES specimens must be moved through a designated point of entry and exit where documentation must be presented for endorsement by Border Force officials. As a result of the NI Protocol, NI will be treated as part of the EU’s customs territory and the permits and checks usually required under CITES will not be required for movements between NI and EU Member States.

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