GCE A-level: Assessments

Department for Education written question – answered on 9th July 2020.

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Photo of Neil O'Brien Neil O'Brien Conservative, Harborough

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of pupils achieved the equivalent of AAA or better at A-level in each English region in each of the last 10 years.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

The table below provides information on the percentage of students achieving 3 A*-A grades or better at A level by region between 2009/10 to 2018/19[1],[2]

Region

2010

2011

2012

2013[3]

20143

20153

2016[4]

20174

20184

20194

State-funded sector

9.8

10.2

10.0

9.8

9.4

9.2

10.5

11.1

10.7

10.8

North East

7.6

7.8

7.6

7.6

7.0

7.4

8.8

10.0

9.3

10.2

North West

10.4

10.9

10.0

10.0

9.6

9.3

10.8

10.9

10.1

10.2

Yorkshire and The Humber

8.8

9.5

9.2

9.2

8.6

8.2

9.9

10.8

10.2

10.0

East Midlands

8.3

8.5

8.4

8.8

8.1

7.9

9.0

9.9

11.4

9.1

West Midlands

8.7

9.2

9.3

8.6

7.9

7.8

9.2

9.2

9.1

9.3

East of England

10.3

10.9

11.0

10.3

10.6

10.2

10.8

11.3

9.8

11.6

London

9.9

10.1

9.3

9.7

9.2

9.2

10.4

11.6

11.7

11.6

Inner London

6.8

6.9

6.7

6.5

6.9

6.4

8.1

9.8

10.4

11.3

Outer London

11.1

11.3

11.2

11.0

10.2

10.4

11.5

12.4

12.3

11.7

South East

11.1

11.2

11.3

10.9

10.5

10.3

11.8

12.4

11.5

11.8

South West

10.0

10.6

10.4

10.5

10.1

10.0

11.0

11.0

11.1

11.1

[1] Covers students at the end of advanced level study who were entered for at least one A level, applied single A level, applied double A level or combined A/AS level during 16-18 study, excluding critical thinking and general studies. This measure only includes A level students who have entered less than a total of size 1 in other academic, applied general and tech level qualifications.

[2] An applied double award A level at grade A*A* counts as two grade A*s, AA counts as two grade As and an award at grade AB counts as one grade A.

[3] Figures from 2012/13 to 2014/15 cover students at the end of advanced level study who were entered for at least one A level, applied single award A level, applied double award A level or combined A/AS level in the reporting year. Figures for earlier years cover students who were entered for at least one A level, applied single award A level, applied double award A level or combined A/AS level in the summer of the reporting year.

[4] Figures for 2015/16 onwards cover students at the of advanced level study who were entered for at least one A/AS level, applied single A/AS level, applied double A/AS level or combined A/AS level during their 16-18 study. As a result there was a jump in the A level cohort in 2016, since gradually reversed with reforms to A Levels, with the progressive decoupling of AS and A Level subjects. Therefore figures are not directly comparable to earlier years.

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