Personal Independence Payment

Department for Work and Pensions written question – answered at on 20 March 2020.

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Photo of Carla Lockhart Carla Lockhart DUP, Upper Bann

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have died while waiting for their eligibility for personal independence payments to be determined; and what the main disabling condition was of those people.

Photo of Justin Tomlinson Justin Tomlinson The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting and the Department treats the death of any claimant sympathetically. Claims made under Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI) are fast tracked and are being cleared in 6 working days on average (as at the end of October 2019, the latest available published data).

The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department.

Between the introduction of PIP in April 2013 and 31st October 2019, the latest date for which published data is available, 4,617,990 decisions were made on claims to PIP. Of these, 20,830 (less than 0.5%) claimants died prior to a decision being made on their case.

The Department only records the disabilities of claimants who have reached the assessment stage. Therefore, the disabilities of claimants who passed away prior to the assessment stage appear under “Unknown or missing” in the table below.

Table: Disability of claimants who died prior to a decision being made on their PIP claim (Great Britain only).

Normal Rules (at registration)

Special Rules (at registration)

Total

Autoimmune disease

40

#

40

Cardiovascular disease

320

30

350

Diseases of the immune system

#

#

#

Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, biliary tract

320

90

410

Endocrine disease

70

#

70

Gastrointestinal disease

30

10

40

Genitourinary disease

120

30

150

Haematological Disease

10

#

10

Hearing disorders

#

#

#

Infectious disease

20

#

20

Malignant disease

1,740

4,510

6,250

Metabolic disease

10

#

10

Multisystem and extremes of age

#

#

#

Musculoskeletal disease (general)

200

#

210

Musculoskeletal disease (regional)

190

#

190

Neurological disease

450

40

490

Psychiatric disorders

820

10

830

Respiratory disease

500

40

540

Skin disease

30

#

30

Unknown or missing

10,460

700

11,160

Visual disease

30

#

30

Total

15,370

5,470

20,830

Please note that the DWP is only responsible for benefits in Great Britain. Social security benefits, including PIP, are a devolved matter in Northern Ireland. Questions about PIP claimants in Northern Ireland should be directed to the Department of Communities in Northern Ireland.

Notes:

  • These figures include claims made under Normal Rules or Special Rules for Terminal Illness and include new claims and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to PIP reassessment claims.
  • If a claimant dies before a decision is made on an outstanding claim, the Department establishes whether the claimant’s representative or next of kin wishes to proceed with the claim. If not, the claim is withdrawn.
  • It is possible for claims to transition between Normal and Special Rules during the course of the claimant journey.
  • This is unpublished data from the PIP computer system’s (PIP CS) management information. It should be used with caution and may be subject to future revision.
  • Figures cover claims on which a decision has been made and recorded on the PIP CS on or prior to 31st October 2019. Claims on which a decision has not been entered are excluded.
  • Claimants’ dates of death are as recorded on the system at 6th March 2020 and may be subject to retrospection.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10, ‘#’ indicates a figure under 5 and individual numbers may not sum to the total because of rounding.
  • GB only.

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