Only a few days to go: We’re raising £25,000 to keep TheyWorkForYou running and make sure people across the UK can hold their elected representatives to account.

Donate to our crowdfunder

High Speed 2 Railway Line and Public Expenditure

Treasury written question – answered on 23rd October 2019.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Alan Brown Alan Brown Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Transport), Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Energy)

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) expenditure on High Speed Rail 2 and (b) Scottish Barnett Consequential allocation was in each year since 2010.

Photo of Rishi Sunak Rishi Sunak The Chief Secretary to the Treasury

There has been a total spend up to 31 March 2019 of £7.4bn made up of HS2 Ltd spend and spend by the Department for Transport on HS2 Land and Property. The profile of this spend is set out in the table below. These numbers have been taken from Departmental accounts and exclude £0.6bn incurred by HS2 Ltd to date on construction VAT.

Total spend on HS2 excluding construction VAT (£m)

2009-10

9.5

2010-11

14.6

2011-12

34.2

2012-13

182.8

2013-14

207.9

2014-15

185.2

2015-16

348.9

2016-17

1,466.5

2017-18

2,767.2

2018-19

2,191.4

Total

7,408.2

As set out in HM Treasury’s Statement of Funding Policy, the Barnett formula is generally applied at departmental level at Spending Reviews/Rounds and at programme level at fiscal events. Since 2010, HS2 has received all its funding through the Department for Transport’s settlements at Spending Reviews/Rounds where Barnett has been applied at departmental level. The spending on HS2 is not therefore associated with specific Barnett consequentials.

HM Treasury’s Spending Review/Round documents set out the block grant funding for the Scottish Government. Documents relating to SR10, SR13, SR15 and SR19 can be found on the gov.uk website.

Following UK Government decisions at Spending Round 2019, the Scottish Government benefitted from an increase of over £1.2bn in the Barnett-based block grant, which will increase to £34.4bn in 2020-21.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes4 people think so

No17 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.