Energy: Imports

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy written question – answered on 2nd October 2019.

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Photo of Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Wales, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Housing, Communities and Local Government)

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK’s current dependency on energy supplied by interconnectors.

Photo of Lord Duncan of Springbank Lord Duncan of Springbank Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office), Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)

An error has been identified in the written answer given on 09 September 2019.

The correct answer should have been:

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. I will correspond directly with my noble Friend.

The latest figures on electricity supplied by interconnectors are available in the 2019 ‘Energy Trends: Electricity’, published by BEIS. In Q1 2019, net imports of electricity via interconnectors were 6.0 TWh for the UK. This is equivalent to 6.4% of total demand over the period. In Great Britain, as part of the Capacity Market process, National Grid Electricity System Operator assesses how much capacity will be needed in the years ahead factoring in the risks of particular technologies not delivering. This annual process includes an assessment of how interconnectors should be derated to reflect the likely reliability of electricity flow during times of stress. We then secure all the capacity needed through the Capacity Market, ensuring we meet our reliability standard.

In Northern Ireland, the Single Electricity Market operates as a single, shared wholesale electricity market between Ireland and Northern Ireland, with electricity flows between Ireland and Northern Ireland treated as internal flows. The Single Electricity Market’s capacity remuneration mechanism is working well to ensure security of supply of electricity in Northern Ireland.

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Photo of Lord Duncan of Springbank Lord Duncan of Springbank Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office), Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. I will correspond directly with my noble Friend.

The latest figures on electricity supplied by interconnectors are available in the 2019 ‘Energy Trends: Electricity’, published by BEIS. In Q1 2019, net imports of electricity via interconnectors were 6.0 TWh for the UK. This is equivalent to 6.4% of total demand over the period. In Great Britain, as part of the Capacity Market process, National Grid Electricity System Operator assesses how much capacity will be needed in the years ahead factoring in the risks of particular technologies not delivering. This annual process includes an assessment of how interconnectors should be derated to reflect the likely reliability of electricity flow during times of stress. We then secure all the capacity needed through the Capacity Market, ensuring we meet our reliability standard.

In Northern Ireland, the Single Electricity Market operates as a single, shared wholesale electricity market between Ireland and Northern Ireland, with electricity flows between Ireland and Northern Ireland treated as internal flows. The Single Electricity Market’s capacity remuneration mechanism is working well to ensure security of supply of electricity in Northern Ireland.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.