Brexit: Parliamentary Scrutiny

Leader of the House written question – answered on 5th September 2019.

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Photo of Lyn Brown Lyn Brown Shadow Minister (Treasury)

To ask the Leader of the House, what assessment he as made of the effect of the prorogation of Parliament between 9 and 12 September 2019 and the 14 October 2019 on the number of sitting days available for Parliamentary scrutiny of (a) Bills before the House and (b) Statutory Instruments relating to the UK’s Exit from the European Union subject to the (i) affirmative and (ii) negative procedure in advance of the 31st October 2019; and what assessment he has made of the level of risk that legislation in relation to the Government’s No Deal preparation will not have adequate parliamentary time to be passed.

Photo of Lyn Brown Lyn Brown Shadow Minister (Treasury)

To ask the Leader of the House, what estimate he has made of the number of sitting days available for Parliamentary scrutiny in advance of 31 October 2019 of (a) Bills, (b) affirmative procedure statutory instruments and (c) negative procedure statutory instruments relating to the UK leaving the EU.

Photo of Lyn Brown Lyn Brown Shadow Minister (Treasury)

To ask the Leader of the House, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) Bills, (b) affirmative procedure statutory instruments and (c) negative procedure statutory instruments that need to pass through Parliament in advance of 31 October 2019 in order to meet the Government’s preparation objectives for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Photo of Jacob Rees-Mogg Jacob Rees-Mogg Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons

The necessary EU exit bills for 31 October in a no-deal scenario are in place. Further primary legislation will be needed after exit day as a result of the UK leaving the EU. The number of sitting days available for Parliamentary scrutiny of legislation in advance of 31 October will depend on when the parliamentary session ends during the week of 9 September.

Given the expected conference recess period of typically three weeks, prorogation of Parliament would mean that the number of sittings days would be between four and seven fewer than would have been available for the scrutiny of legislation, where Parliament would have otherwise been sitting. To date we have laid over 580 EU exit SIs. The Government is confident that the necessary secondary legislation will be in force by 31 October.

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