Prison Officers: Pay

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 30th July 2019.

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Photo of Imran Hussain Imran Hussain Shadow Minister (Justice)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what was the mean average salary for a Band 3-5 prison officer in each year from 2010.

Photo of Lucy Frazer Lucy Frazer The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice

The requested figures are available for years going back to 2013 and are presented below.

In 2012 HM Prison Service introduced modernised pay and grading arrangements. A number of staff recruited prior to this continue to be employed on legacy pay and grading arrangements. Two sets of figures are therefore presented. Those for modernised terms are influenced by staff turnover and position within pay range much more so than for legacy terms (for which all staff are now at pay range maximum).

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Modernised Terms

£19,784

£26,272

£24,527

£24,804

£25,179

£24,531

£24,989

Legacy Terms

£28,493

£28,708

£29,336

£29,560

£29,536

£29,896

£30,468

Figures for legacy arrangements are for a contractual 39 hour working week. Figures for modernised arrangements are for a contractual 37 hour week (although Band 3 Prison Officers can opt to work additional hours).

All figures are based on the national rate of pay and include a premium for required unsocial hours working. There are additional uplifts for the Outer and Inner London Zones (typically £4,250 and £3,100 for legacy arrangements and £2,659 and £4,046 for modernised arrangements).

While not reflected in the figures presented, HMMPS has recently announced for a second year in a row above inflation pay rises of over 2%. These increase are expected to be paid (and backdated to April) in the Autumn. On top of that, we have made further pledges to recruit and retain prison officers and managers, helping to make our prisons safer and reduce reoffending.

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