Recorders

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 2nd August 2019.

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Photo of Richard Burgon Richard Burgon Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Recorders have sat to hear cases in each year since 2010.

Photo of Edward Argar Edward Argar The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

Information on how many Recorders have sat to hear cases in each year has only been held centrally since 2017/18. The below table, however, sets out the number of Recorders in post at 1st April of each year since 2010. We expect Recorders in post to have been offered the opportunity to sit.

Year

Number of Recorders1

2010

1,233

2011

1,221

2012

1,155

2013

1,196

2014

1,126

2015

1,031

2016

1,130

2017

920

2018

830

2019

873

1 Figures are at 1st April of each year.

Some Recorders hold more than one judicial appointment. In such cases, the appointment that the judicial office holder undertakes for the majority of their time is known as their primary appointment. In order to avoid double counting of judges, this table shows figures for primary appointments only and as such will not count judges whose appointment as a Recorder is not their primary appointment.

Figures are from the published Judicial Diversity Statistics which can be found here: https://www.judiciary.uk/publication-type/statistics/

Recorders sit mainly in the Crown, County and Family Courts. Figures on court sitting days are published on Gov.uk and the latest information covering 2018 is available here. It is part of the Royal Courts of Justice Annual Tables (which contain at Tables 5.1 and 5.2 a breakdown of sitting days by type of work and level of judge): https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-justice-statistics-quarterly-january-to-march-2019. This information covers both England and Wales and is published annually.

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