Prison Officers: Standards

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 12th July 2019.

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Photo of Richard Burgon Richard Burgon Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of prison officers in post was in each prison where performance was found to be of serious concern in the Annual Prison Performance Ratings 2017-18 in the last six months of (a) 2017 and (b) 2018.

Photo of Edward Argar Edward Argar The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

The table below sets out average numbers of prison officers in each prison where prison was found to be of serious concern during 2017-18.

Table 1: Average1 number of HMPPS band 3-5 prison officers2 in post in each prison where performance was found to be of serious concern in the Annual Prison Performance Ratings 2017-183.

Full Time Equivalent

Average number of Prison officers in post…

Between July and December 2017

Between July and December 2018

Bedford

134

174

Bristol

191

194

Chelmsford

226

232

Exeter

172

178

Lindholme

219

238

Liverpool

367

351

Nottingham

292

285

Onley

154

167

Portland

149

144

The Mount

151

238

Wandsworth

286

428

Winchester

193

211

Wormwood Scrubs

227

316

1. Average of monthly snapshots, taken at the end of the month.

2. Includes Band 3-4 / Prison Officer (incl. specialists), Band 4 / Supervising Officer and Band 5 / Custodial Managers.

3. Includes Public Sector Prisons only. Excludes Birmingham and Peterborough which are private prisons.

Every public sector prison has an agreed safe, decent and secure operating level (SDSOL) which reflects the category of prison and the types of prisoners held. The SDSOL is central to the delivery of the regime in every prison. Since April 2017 Governors have been empowered to manage workforce planning locally and use this flexibility to set their own staffing arrangements.

We are recruiting more prison officers across England and Wales as part of the Offender Management in Custody model (OMiC) and to support Youth Justice Reform. The majority of newly recruited Prison Officers are already on the landings, joining our officers who play a vital role in making sure prisons are safe, secure and decent.

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