Blue Badge Scheme: Dementia

Department for Transport written question – answered on 11th June 2019.

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Photo of Siobhain McDonagh Siobhain McDonagh Labour, Mitcham and Morden

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to ensure that guidance to local authorities under the expanded Blue Badge eligibility criteria for non-physical disabilities that comes into force on 30 August 2019 will explicitly address the needs of people living with dementia.

Photo of Siobhain McDonagh Siobhain McDonagh Labour, Mitcham and Morden

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Blue Badges have been issued to people who have dementia recorded as their primary disability.

Photo of Siobhain McDonagh Siobhain McDonagh Labour, Mitcham and Morden

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people with dementia have had their application for a Blue Badge declined.

Photo of Siobhain McDonagh Siobhain McDonagh Labour, Mitcham and Morden

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people with dementia have appealed an unsuccessful Blue Badge application; and how many of those appeals were successful.

Photo of Michael Ellis Michael Ellis Minister of State (Department for Transport)

From 30th August 2019, Blue Badge eligibility will be expanded to include explicitly people whose non-physical disabilities. As is currently the case, applications under the expanded regime will be subject to assessment by local authorities.

Currently there are no centrally held records of either the number of Blue Badge applicants who have dementia recorded as their primary disability, whether or not a badge was issued, or of any associated appeals.

Shortly, the Department for Transport will issue guidance to local authorities on how to assess the new types of applications. As eligibility will not be condition-specific, the guidance will provide advice on assessing how an applicant’s non-physical disability causes them, during the course of a journey, to be unable to walk, experience very considerable difficulty whilst walking, which may include very considerable psychological distress, or be at risk of serious harm when walking, or pose, when walking, a risk of serious harm to any other person.

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