Personal Independence Payment: Epilepsy

Department for Work and Pensions written question – answered on 16th April 2019.

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Photo of Jonathan Edwards Jonathan Edwards Shadow PC Spokesperson (Treasury), Shadow PC Spokesperson (Transport), Shadow PC Spokesperson (Foreign Intervention), Shadow PC Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people identifying as having a primary condition of epilepsy have been awarded personal independence payment (a) after mandatory reconsideration of their initial assessment and (b) at a tribunal in each year since 2013.

Photo of Justin Tomlinson Justin Tomlinson The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

The information requested for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Cases where Epilepsy was listed as a Main Disability can be found in the table below.

Table: PIP claimants with a primary disabling condition of Epilepsy - initial decisions where PIP was awarded or disallowed after a PIP assessment, and decisions changed/overturned at the Mandatory Reconsiderations (MRs) or Appeals stage, by financial year of initial decision, Great Britain.

Financial Year of Initial Decision

All Initial PIP Decisions

Initial Decisions Awarded

Initial Decisions –

Disallowed due to failing the

assessment

Of Initial Decisions Disallowed:

MR –

Decision Changed

Appeal – Decision Overturned

2013/14

1,050

650

410

30

20

2014/15

9,810

4,650

5,160

210

450

2015/16

9,290

2,670

6,620

190

930

2016/17

14,740

4,440

10,300

430

2,210

2017/18

14,770

5,490

9,280

760

1,690

2018/19

(April - December 18)

11,300

7,180

4,120

350

150

Since PIP was introduced 3.9m decisions have been made in Great Britain across all health conditions up to December 2018, of these 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned.

Under PIP, 27 per cent of working age claimants with epilepsy recorded as their primary disabling condition receive the highest level of support compared to 6 per cent under Disability Living Allowance when PIP was introduced

Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics. The disability subgroup of Epilepsy in the PIP Computer System includes Cataplexy, Generalised seizures (with status epilepticus in last 12 months), Generalised seizures (without status epilepticus in last 12 months), Narcolepsy, Partial seizures (with status epilepticus in last 12 months), Partial seizures (without status epilepticus in last 12 months) and Seizures - unclassified. In the application process, claimants’ primary disabling condition is only recorded for collation by the Department at assessment.

PIP data includes normal rules and special rules for the terminally ill claimants, and is for new claims only, and therefore excludes DLA reassessment claims.

Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.

Appeals data taken from the DWP PIP computer system’s management information. Therefore this data may differ from that held by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics.

Decisions overturned at appeal may include a number of appeals that have been lapsed (which is where DWP changed the decision after an appeal was lodged but before it was heard at Tribunal).

Some decisions which are changed at MR, and where the claimant continues to appeal for a higher PIP award, are then changed again at tribunal appeal. Therefore, the number of people who had a decision changed at MR and the number of people who had a decision changed at tribunal appeal cannot be added together.

Claimants who have received benefit decisions more recently may not yet have had time to complete the claimant journey and progress to appeal.

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