GCE A-level: Arts

Department for Education written question – answered on 21st February 2019.

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Photo of Kevin Brennan Kevin Brennan Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Arts and Heritage)

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken to ensure that students living in areas of highest deprivation have the opportunity to study arts subjects at A-level.

Photo of Kevin Brennan Kevin Brennan Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Arts and Heritage)

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate his Department has made of the trend in the number of schools in areas of highest deprivation offering A-level music to students since 2010.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

The Department wants to ensure that all students have the opportunity to study arts subjects at A level if they wish to do so, regardless of their background or geographic location. It is up to individual schools and colleges to decide which A level courses to offer, and as part of that they may wish to work together with other schools and colleges in the area to combine resources and maximise choice.

The Department does not hold information on the number of institutions that have offered A level music. Instead the Department holds data for the exams entered at each institution. The attached table shows the number of institutions that entered at least one student for music A level. As context, it also shows the overall number of institutions that entered at least one student for an A level in any subject, and the percentage of those institutions that entered at least one student for music A level.

The number of institutions was recorded for each Local Authority District (LAD) in England; each of these LADs were ranked according to their deprivation score, as measured by the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index, and split into quintiles. The data is not held in the same format prior to 2015/16, so equivalent figures for earlier years could not be calculated without incurring disproportionate costs.

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