Convictions

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 8th February 2019.

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Photo of Neil O'Brien Neil O'Brien Conservative, Harborough

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who previously had (a) no, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more convictions, were convicted in each of the last three years but did not receive an immediate custodial sentence.

Photo of Lucy Frazer Lucy Frazer The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

The data relate to convictions for all criminal offences, imprisonable and non-imprisonable. Non-imprisonable offences will never result in a custodial sentence: the maximum penalty is a fine. Sentencing must match the severity of the crime. We will always hold in prison those criminals whose offences are so grave that no other penalty will suffice. However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing short sentences do not work in helping some offenders turn their backs on crime. The number of people convicted of (a) no, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more convictions, who were convicted in each of the last three years but did not receive an immediate custodial sentence can be viewed in the table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 10.39 KB)

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