Secondary Education: Teachers

Department for Education written question – answered on 7th February 2019.

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Photo of Dan Jarvis Dan Jarvis Labour, Barnsley Central

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to increase teacher recruitment in secondary schools.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

The Department has developed the Teaching Vacancies Service, a national search and listing service for teaching roles. This makes it easier for schools to advertise posts free of charge to tackle the up to £75 million per year spent on advertising for full time posts. The service will be available to all state schools in England by March 2019. It can be found at https://teaching-vacancies.service.gov.uk/.

The Department has put in place a range of measures, including generous bursaries, worth up to £26,000 for priority subjects, to encourage trainees to key subjects such as languages and physics. We are also testing new financial incentives for priority subject teachers. These include early-career payments for new maths teachers and a student loan reimbursement scheme for languages and science teachers.

On 28 January 2019 the Department launched the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy which outlines 4 key areas for reform and investment: create the right climate for leaders to establish supportive school cultures, transform support for early career teachers, build a career offer that remains attractive to teachers as their careers and lives develop, and make it easier for great people to become teachers.

Designed collaboratively with the sector, the centrepiece of the strategy is the Early Career Framework, which will underpin a fully-funded, two-year package of structured support for all early career teachers linked to the best available research evidence. The strategy can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teacher-recruitment-and-retention-strategy.

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