Adoption and Free Schools

Department for Education written question – answered on 8th February 2019.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Jon Trickett Jon Trickett Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office), Shadow Lord President of the Council

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many civil servants in his Department work on the (a) free school and (b) adoption policy streams; and how many civil servants worked on those streams in June 2016.

Photo of Anne Milton Anne Milton Minister of State (Education)

Holding answer received on 07 February 2019

Civil servants working within the Free Schools Directorate are responsible for the policy development and the delivery of the free schools programme. They are supported by civil servants working within the Free Schools Capital Division, who are responsible for finding sites and buildings, and refurbishing existing buildings for new free schools. The Free Schools Programme is predominantly delivered by central government, with tightly prescribed responsibilities for local authorities. As of 5 February 2019, there are approximately 290 full-time equivalent civil servants working in the Free Schools Directorate and within the Free Schools Capital Division (which sits in the Operations Directorate). In June 2016, there were slightly fewer civil servants working within Free Schools Directorate and the Free Schools Capital Division.

As of 5 February 2019, there are approximately 15 full-time equivalent civil servants working on adoption policy in the Social Care, Mobility and Disadvantage Directorate. In June 2016, there were approximately 20 full-time equivalent civil servants working on adoption policy in the Social Care, Mobility and Disadvantage Directorate. These civil servants are responsible for national adoption policy. The majority of the delivery of adoption policy is carried out by the local adoption agencies in each top tier local authority, based on the statutory requirements.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.