Police: Pensions

Home Office written question – answered on 4th January 2019.

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Photo of Louise Haigh Louise Haigh Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Policing)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral statement of 13 December 2018 on Police Funding Settlement, Official Report, column 431, for what reason the resource provided to cover unexpected increases in the contribution to public sector pensions will match the £165m identified by police chiefs as being the liability in 2019-20.

Photo of Nick Hurd Nick Hurd The Minister of State, Home Department

An error has been identified in the written answer given on 21 December 2018.

The correct answer should have been:

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of police officers employed by each police force in England and Wales on a bi-annual basis. These figures present a picture of the workforce as at the 31 March and as at 30 September each year. These data are published in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical publication, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Data on the number of officers per 100,000 of the resident population, by police force area, are published on an annual basis. The latest available data on the number of police officers per 100,000 of the population can be found in Table_H4 of the data tables accompanying the main release, the latest of which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2018

Data on the number of police officers are collected at Police Force Area level only, and cannot be broken at local authority level.

The Home Office does not hold information on response times of the police.

In his Budget, the Chancellor committed to providing funding for the police in 2019/20 to cover additional pensions costs beyond the £165m which was expected at Budget 2016.

The pensions grant announced at the settlement covers the additional pension costs above £165m for the police officer scheme, and the additional pension costs above £11m for police staff. This reflects revised costings following technical changes to how the actuarial estimate of the increase in costs for officers is assessed. Total expected cost pressures arising from the valuations are now £302m for the police officer scheme and £27m for police staff.

The Government is enabling an overall increase in funding of up to £970m in police funding including precept and national priorities. This pensions funding, taken together with the additional grant funding and local precept, provides sufficient means for the police to meet cost increases, while continuing to recruit and invest in the capabilities they need.

Cost pressures, including pensions, beyond 2019/20 will be considered as part of the next Spending Review where decisions on longer term police funding will be made in the round.

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Photo of Nick Hurd Nick Hurd The Minister of State, Home Department

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of police officers employed by each police force in England and Wales on a bi-annual basis. These figures present a picture of the workforce as at the 31 March and as at 30 September each year. These data are published in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical publication, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Data on the number of officers per 100,000 of the resident population, by police force area, are published on an annual basis. The latest available data on the number of police officers per 100,000 of the population can be found in Table_H4 of the data tables accompanying the main release, the latest of which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2018

Data on the number of police officers are collected at Police Force Area level only, and cannot be broken at local authority level.

The Home Office does not hold information on response times of the police.

In his Budget, the Chancellor committed to providing funding for the police in 2019/20 to cover additional pensions costs beyond the £165m which was expected at Budget 2016.

The pensions grant announced at the settlement covers the additional pension costs above £165m for the police officer scheme, and the additional pension costs above £11m for police staff. This reflects revised costings following technical changes to how the actuarial estimate of the increase in costs for officers is assessed. Total expected cost pressures arising from the valuations are now £302m for the police officer scheme and £27m for police staff.

The Government is enabling an overall increase in funding of up to £970m in police funding including precept and national priorities. This pensions funding, taken together with the additional grant funding and local precept, provides sufficient means for the police to meet cost increases, while continuing to recruit and invest in the capabilities they need.

Cost pressures, including pensions, beyond 2019/20 will be considered as part of the next Spending Review where decisions on longer term police funding will be made in the round.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.

Photo of Louise Haigh Louise Haigh Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Policing)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral statement 13 December 2018 on Police Funding Settlement, Official Report, column 431, what plans the Government has to meet the unexpected increases in their contribution to public sector pensions in 2020-21.

Photo of Louise Haigh Louise Haigh Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Policing)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of 13 December 2018 of the Minister for Policing and the Fire Service, Official Report column 432, whether police forces will be required to use any of the approximately £150 million provided to cover unexpected increases in their contribution to public sector pensions in 2020-21.