Prison Officers: Disciplinary Proceedings

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 19th December 2018.

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Photo of Emma Lewell-Buck Emma Lewell-Buck Shadow Minister (Education) (Children and Families)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of prison officers in each of the under-18 young offender institutions that were dismissed or disciplined in each of the last five years; and for what reasons was each of those dismissed or disciplined.

Photo of Edward Argar Edward Argar The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

An error has been identified in the written answer given on 18 December 2018.

The correct answer should have been:

HM Prison and Probation workforce statistics (which contains staffing figures in public sector prisons but not in privately managed prisons) are published quarterly. The figures are broken down by establishment and by prison category including male Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) for those aged 15-17. All staff working with children have to undergo an enhanced DBS check as part of the vetting process before taking up such roles. The latest publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hm-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-september-2018

Attached are tables showing the staff numbers at YOIs and details on the numbers of those dismissed or disciplined. Values of 2 or fewer have not been included to avoid the possibility of identification of individuals and to prevent disclosure in accordance with the Data Protection Act, 1998.

In relation to conduct and discipline cases this meant a breakdown of the reasons behind the actions could not be provided due to the very low numbers involved. Please also note that since June 2016 HMPPS has taken over the running of Medway Secure Training Centre and 151 FTE staff transferred in. In September 2017, 59 FTE staff transferred in to the newly created Youth Custody Service.

All prison officers working in under 18 YOIs currently undergo a young person specific and child-centred Prison Officer Entry Level Training (POELT) course. This course incorporates both the Working with Young People in Custody (WYPC) course and Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint (MMPR) training elements. The structure of the 10 week course allows learners to understand the ethos, values, morals and ethics that are integral to working with young people.

We are introducing a new Youth Justice Specialist role and are providing funding for every Prison Officer in the Youth Custody Service to undertake a distance-learning university-accredited qualification in youth justice so that they can transition them to this role. Supervising Officers will also be funded to undertake this training and transition to the new role on level transfer. All staff undertaking the qualification will be offered the opportunity to continue their study for another year to achieve a full foundation degree, fully-funded by the Youth Custody Service (YCS). There are over 300 frontline staff currently enrolled on this qualification and we will fund 250 places on this qualification per year for staff in the youth secure estate over the next four years. We intend for this to be the new standard training for frontline officers in the YCS by 2023

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 19.35 KB)

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Photo of Edward Argar Edward Argar The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

HM Prison and Probation workforce statistics (which contains staffing figures in public sector prisons but not in privately managed prisons) are published quarterly. The figures are broken down by establishment and by prison category including male Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) for those aged 15-17. All staff working with children have to undergo an enhanced DBS check as part of the vetting process before taking up such roles. The latest publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hm-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-september-2018

Attached are tables showing the staff numbers at YOIs and details on the numbers of those dismissed or disciplined. Values of 2 or fewer have not been included to avoid the possibility of identification of individuals and to prevent disclosure in accordance with the Data Protection Act, 1998.

In relation to conduct and discipline cases this meant a breakdown of the reasons behind the actions could not be provided due to the very low numbers involved. Please also note that since June 2016 HMPPS has taken over the running of Medway Secure Training Centre and 151 FTE staff transferred in. In September 2017, 59 FTE staff transferred in to the newly created Youth Custody Service.

All prison officers working in under 18 YOIs currently undergo a young person specific and child-centred Prison Officer Entry Level Training (POELT) course. This course incorporates both the Working with Young People in Custody (WYPC) course and Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint (MMPR) training elements. The structure of the 10 week course allows learners to understand the ethos, values, morals and ethics that are integral to working with young people.

We are introducing a new Youth Justice Specialist role and are providing funding for every Prison Officer in the Youth Custody Service to undertake a distance-learning university-accredited qualification in youth justice so that they can transition them to this role. Supervising Officers will also be funded to undertake this training and transition to the new role on level transfer. All staff undertaking the qualification will be offered the opportunity to continue their study for another year to achieve a full foundation degree, fully-funded by the Youth Custody Service (YCS). There are over 300 frontline staff currently enrolled on this qualification and we will fund 250 places on this qualification per year for staff in the youth secure estate over the next four years. We intend for this to be the new standard training for frontline officers in the YCS by 2023

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 19.35 KB)

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.