Police: Crimes of Violence

Attorney General written question – answered on 3rd December 2018.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Layla Moran Layla Moran Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Education)

To ask the Attorney General, how many police officers have been charged with (a) grievous bodily harm or (b) actual bodily harm by the Crown Prosecution Service and then acquitted after a trial in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Photo of Robert Buckland Robert Buckland The Solicitor-General

The offences of grievous and actual bodily harm are created by the Offences against the Person Act 1861. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of defendants charged with, or prosecuted for these offences. This information could only be obtained by examining CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

While the CPS does not hold a central record of defendants prosecuted by specific offences, records are held reporting the number of defendants, identified as being persons serving with the police, who are assigned the Principal Offence Category ‘Offences against the Person’ at finalisation. Persons serving with the police are defined as, and include, police staff, community support officers and contracted escort and detention officers in addition to serving police officers. These figures are identified by way of a monitoring flag, administered by a member of staff highlighting it as a “Police complaint” case.

The table below shows the number of prosecuted defendants, flagged as being persons serving with the police and whose Principal Offence Category was identified as ‘Offences against the Person’, in each of the last five years.

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

Total Defendants Prosecuted

43

45

121

94

92

Total Trials

16

18

31

21

39

Convicted after Trial

9

10

13

8

18

Acquitted after Trial

7

8

18

13

21

% Acquitted

44%

44%

58%

62%

54%

Does this answer the above question?

Yes1 person thinks so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.