Charities

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport written question – answered on 22nd October 2018.

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Photo of Steve Reed Steve Reed Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Civil Society)

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taken to ensure the implementation of the commitment made in the Civil Society Strategy, published by his Department in August 2018, that being in receipt of taxpayers’ money should not inhibit charities from making their voices heard; and whether he has plans to end the use of anti-advocacy clauses.

Photo of Steve Reed Steve Reed Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Civil Society)

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of anti-advocacy clauses in Government contracts on charities that have an income of less than £1 million pounds.

Photo of Tracey Crouch Tracey Crouch The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

The government is determined that charities and social enterprises should be fully confident in their right to speak in public debates, and to have a strong campaigning and advocacy role.

Where suppliers encounter unreasonable contract terms in Government contracts they can make use of the Mystery Shopper service. Introduced in 2011, it allows suppliers to report poor procurement practice. Nearly 1,500 cases have been received to date and, of the total cases closed during 2017-18, 99% resulted in positive change. The Mystery Shopper Service can be contacted via MysteryShopper@cabinetoffice.gov.uk

No assessment has been made of the effect of anti-advocacy clauses in Government contracts on charities that have an income of less than £1 million pounds.

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