Secondary Education: Curriculum

Department for Education written question – answered on 18th September 2018.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many hours of (1) art and design, (2) music, (3) drama,( 4) design and technology, (5) history, and (6) geography were taught at key stage 3 in state secondary schools in England in each year from 2010 to 2017.

Photo of Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)

To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the annual percentage change in the number of teaching hours for (1) art and design, (2) music, (3) drama, (4) design and technology, (5) history, and (6) geography at key stage 3 in state secondary schools in England in each year from 2010 to 2017.

Photo of Lord Agnew of Oulton Lord Agnew of Oulton The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education

The requested information is shown in the attached table.

As the total number of hours taught to key stage 3 year groups varies each year, the percentage of time spent teaching each of the subjects requested has also been provided for context. The figures shown in the attached table cover teaching in years 7, 8 and 9.

Information on subjects taught at key stage 3 is collected from a large sample of schools, this is then weighted and grossed to provide national totals. The percentage of schools returning this information each year has been provided for context.

Schools have the freedom to decide how to teach the curriculum, but must make sure it is broad and balanced, offering a range of subjects to help pupils progress through acquiring knowledge, understanding and skills.

Traditionally GCSEs are two year courses of study that pupils start in year 10. The new national curriculum and reformed GCSEs are designed so that key stage 3 plays an important role in preparing pupils for natural progression to GCSEs.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.