Prison Officers: Crimes of Violence

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 26th June 2018.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Richard Burgon Richard Burgon Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officer work days have been lost to sickness as a result of an injury sustained in a workplace assault in each year since 2010.

Photo of Rory Stewart Rory Stewart The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice

Holding answer received on 25 June 2018

HM Prison & Probation Service (HMPPS) is committed to ensuring the health, safety and wellbeing of its staff. HMPPS has systems in place to deal with perpetrators of violence against staff quickly and robustly, with serious incidents referred to the police for prosecution.

The number of working days lost as a result of an injury sustained in a workplace assault specifically cannot be extracted from the data that is held. However the number of working days lost amongst band 3-5 prison officers due to sick reasons defined as work related accidents, injuries or assaults is shown in Table 1 below. This data is available in the quarterly HMPPS (formerly NOMS) workforce statistics.

Table 1: Working days lost amongst band 3-5 prison officers due to sick reasons defined as work related accidents/injuries/assaults, 2009/10 to 2017/18

Financial year

Number of working days lost due to work related accidents/injuries/assaults1

2009/10

25,246

2010/11

37,351

2011/12

33,287

2012/13

30,080

2013/14

36,440

2014/15

43,926

2015/16

39,652

2016/172

24,074

2017/182

14,973

Notes:

1 Figures provided are based on records where sickness reasons are defined as work related injury/assault or work related accident/injury.

2 Between January and March 2017, during migration of data to the Single Operating Platform, an

Under-recording of sickness absence records occurred. There is therefore likely to be an undercount of working days lost for the 12 months to 31 March 2017. Furthermore, investigations are ongoing regarding more recent sickness absence data so figures for the 12 months to 31 March 2018 should be treated with caution.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes0 people think so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.