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Housing

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government written question – answered on 1st May 2018.

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Photo of John Healey John Healey Shadow Secretary of State for Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what proportion of receipts from Right to Buy sales received by each local authority were retained for providing replacement social housing in each year since 2012-2013.

Photo of Dominic Raab Dominic Raab Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)

Holding answer received on 26 April 2018

Local authorities can keep a proportion of the receipts from Right to Buy sales to fund new affordable housing. The money is also used to cover the transaction costs of the sales, debt repayment on the properties, and planned income from the previously expected receipts (both the local authority and the Government share), which applied under the previous “pooling” system under which local authority housing was funded.

The proportion of local authorities’ Right to Buy receipts which could be retained for replacement social housing each year since 2012-13 are as follows:

2012-13: 29.56 per cent

2013-14: 40.83 per cent

2014-15: 47.85 per cent

2015-16: 49.36 per cent

2016-17: 52.74 per cent

2017-18: 51.37 per cent

Figures are as indicated in data returns as of February and March 2018.

It is important to note that these figures represent working management information for day-to-day use. They are not finalised and are subject to continuous revisions as local authorities carry out periodic review and reconciliation exercises.

In particular, not all data returns have yet been certified by appropriate council officers.

Figures published on gov.uk include only certified figures.

This may mean some discrepancies between these working figures and those published on gov.uk.

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