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Department for Transport: Regulation

Department for Transport written question – answered on 12th January 2018.

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Photo of Priti Patel Priti Patel Conservative, Witham

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the title was of each set of regulations introduced by his Department in each month since May 2010; which of those regulations have been (a) subject to the (i) one in one out and (ii) one in two out procedure and (b) (i) revoked and (ii) amended; and what the net cost to (A) the public purse; and (B) business of those regulations is.

Photo of Nusrat Ghani Nusrat Ghani Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport), Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)

A table giving the titles of new and amended regulations which have been introduced by the department since May 2010 and indicating which of those have been revoked is attached.

All regulations that regulated or deregulated business were subject to the one-in, one-out rule from January 2011 and subsequently the one-in, two-out rule from January 2013. The changes to regulations affecting business during the 2010-15 Parliament are recorded in Statements of New Regulation that were published every six months and which included accounts of departments’ performance against the one-in, one-out/one-in, two-out rule. These are available on:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/one-in-two-out-statement-of-new-regulation

For the 2015-17 Parliament, the Government will shortly publish its final report on the savings to business delivered during that Parliament.

Estimates of the cost of regulation to the private sector and the public purse are detailed in the Impact Assessments which are published on the legislation.gov.uk website. The table listing regulations includes links to the relevant Impact Assessments. These Impact Assessments show the expected public sector costs and costs to business of each of those regulations.

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