Islamic State: Prosecutions

Home Office written question – answered at on 30 October 2017.

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Photo of Lord Alton of Liverpool Lord Alton of Liverpool Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to implement the recommendation in paragraph 6.2.1. of Council of Europe Resolution 2190 (2017)  to investigate and prosecute any suspected Daesh members who come within the UK’s jurisdiction or control.

Photo of Lord Alton of Liverpool Lord Alton of Liverpool Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to implement the recommendation in paragraph 6.2.2. of Council of Europe Resolution 2190 (2017) to prosecute all offences committed within the UK’s jurisdiction relating to Daesh’s activities abroad, and to ratify and fully implement the 2005 Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism (CETS No. 196) and its 2015 Additional Protocol (CETS No. 217).

Photo of Lord Alton of Liverpool Lord Alton of Liverpool Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recommendation in paragraph 6.2.4. of Council of Europe Resolution 2190 (2017).

Photo of Lord Alton of Liverpool Lord Alton of Liverpool Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recommendation in paragraph 6.2.4. of Council of Europe Resolution 2190 (2017).

Photo of Baroness Williams of Trafford Baroness Williams of Trafford The Minister of State, Home Department

UK terrorism legislation is fully compliant with the Council of Europe Convention and the Additional Protocol, and allows us to prosecute individuals in the UK who have engaged in a broad range of terrorist activity overseas in connection with Daesh or any other terrorist organisation. The UK is a signatory to both instruments and plans to ratify them.

Everyone who returns from taking part in the conflict in Syria or Iraq must expect to be investigated by the police to determine if they have committed criminal offences and to ensure that they do not pose a threat to our national security.

Paragraph 6.2.4 of the Resolution calls on member states to refuse refugee status to fighters who may have committed acts of genocide and/or other serious crimes prohibited under international law.

We have a proud history of providing protection to those who need it, but we will deny the benefits of refugee status to those who commit serious crimes and are a danger to the community and those who are a danger to national security, including war criminals, those who commit crimes against humanity and those involved in terrorism either in the UK or abroad.

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