Children: Poverty

Department for Work and Pensions written question – answered on 18th September 2017.

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Photo of Ben Lake Ben Lake Plaid Cymru, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the merits of replicating the Welsh Government's child poverty strategy.

Photo of Ben Lake Ben Lake Plaid Cymru, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans he has to introduce annual reporting against targets for the Government's child poverty strategy.

Photo of Ben Lake Ben Lake Plaid Cymru, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans he has to introduce quantifiable targets for the Government's next child poverty strategy.

Photo of Ben Lake Ben Lake Plaid Cymru, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish a report on the progress of the delivery of the Government's child poverty strategy against its initial objectives.

Photo of Ben Lake Ben Lake Plaid Cymru, Ceredigion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans he has to introduce a child poverty strategy for 2018 to 2021.

Photo of Caroline Dinenage Caroline Dinenage The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

Tackling child poverty and disadvantage is a priority for this government. To do this requires an approach that goes beyond the safety net of the welfare state to tackle the root causes of poverty and disadvantage. This is why the income-related targets and the requirement to publish a child poverty strategy set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 have been repealed. In their place, we have introduced statutory measures to drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children.

Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families, published on 4 April, set out a framework for a continued focus on improving children’s outcomes, now and in the future. It introduced seven non-statutory indicators and underlying measures to track progress in other areas, such as parental conflict, problem debt and homelessness, that are important in tackling the disadvantages that can affect families’ and children’s outcomes.

The Government has a statutory duty to report annually to Parliament on parental worklessness and children’s education attainment. The latest data on the non-statutory indicators will also be published each year.

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