Sexual Offences: Convictions

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 18th October 2017.

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Photo of Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb Green

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many convictions there were for the offences of (1) gross indecency, (2) attempted gross indecency, (3) buggery, and (4) attempted buggery, in England and Wales from 1987 to 2003.

Photo of Baroness Vere of Norbiton Baroness Vere of Norbiton Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)

The number of offenders found guilty at all courts of all gross indecency and buggery offences in England and Wales from 1987 to 2003 can be viewed in the table.

Offenders found guilty at all courts of selected sexual offences, England and Wales, 1987-2003(1)(2)

Year

Buggery

Gross Indecency and Indecency between males

1987

257

1,199

1988

328

1,579

1989

257

1,199

1990

241

1,324

1991

229

845

1992

213

807

1993

187

592

1994

189

669

1995

169

565

1996

113

381

1997

120

404

1998

141

403

1999

111

295

2000

106

237

2001

91

267

2002

69

279

2003

51

294

(1) Includes the following offences: Buggery includes Sexual Offences Act 1967 Section 1(4),3(1),12, Justice and Public Order 1994 sec 143, 144.Sexual offences Act 2000 sec1. Gross Indecency and Indecency between males includes Criminal Justice and Public 1994 Sec 144, Sexual Offences(Amendment) Act 2000 Sec 1, Indecency with Children Act 1960 Sec 1.

(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

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