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Personal Independence Payment: Appeals

Department for Work and Pensions written question – answered on 27th February 2017.

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Photo of Maria Eagle Maria Eagle Labour, Garston and Halewood

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of unsuccessful mandatory reconsiderations of personal independence payments were overturned at the appeal stage in the last 12 months for which figures are available.

Photo of Penny Mordaunt Penny Mordaunt The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

The table below gives statistics on the number of PIP applications that led to a mandatory reconsideration (MR), appeals being heard and appeals resulting in an increase to the award level in England.

Table 1 – PIP disputes in England (data is not currently available for GB as a whole)

PIP claims that led to an MR

PIP claims that led to an appeal that was heard

Successful appeals

April 2014- March 2015

66,000

5,100

3,200

April 2015- March 2016

117,900

32,400

20,800

Notes:

  • The figures in the table are the result of a complex data match across a number of data sets. They are taken from internal DWP management information and should be viewed as estimates. They may be subject to future revision.
  • Appeals that were lodged but not heard are excluded. Appeals ‘lapsed’ (which is where DWP decided not to contest the appeal) are included in appeals heard.
  • For the above reason the appeals heard cannot be represented as a % of the MRs registered.
  • Appeal data may differ from that held by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics..

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