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Immigration: EEA Nationals

Home Office written question – answered on 29th November 2016.

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Photo of Maria Eagle Maria Eagle Labour, Garston and Halewood

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will ensure that EEA citizens who (a) have resided in the UK for a period exceeding five years and (b) are married to a UK citizen are able to obtain permanent residency in the UK without the need for them to have comprehensive sickness insurance.

Photo of Maria Eagle Maria Eagle Labour, Garston and Halewood

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to review the requirement for EEA citizens to have comprehensive sickness insurance when applying for permanent resident status in the UK as a result of the vote to leave the EU.

Photo of Maria Eagle Maria Eagle Labour, Garston and Halewood

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for permanent resident status from EEA citizens have been rejected since June 2015 on the grounds of the applicant not having comprehensive sickness insurance.

Photo of Robert Goodwill Robert Goodwill The Minister for Immigration

EEA citizens and their family members have the right to enter, live and acquire permanent residence in other Member States when certain conditions are met. This includes, in some cases, a requirement to hold comprehensive sickness insurance. These rights are set out in the Free Movement Directive (Directive 2004/38/EC), which all Member States are bound by. The UK has implemented the Directive through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006.

At present the UK remains in the EU, and as such, EU citizens continue to be subject to the rights and responsibilities set out in existing legislation which governs the exercise of free movement in the UK.

There are a number of options as to how EU migration might work once we have left. We are considering various options and it would be wrong to set out further positions at this stage.

The information requested regarding rejected applications is not collated on centrally held statistical databases and could only be produced at disproportionate cost by examination of individual case files.

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