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Prosecutions

Home Office written question – answered on 23rd November 2016.

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Photo of Andrew Stephenson Andrew Stephenson Conservative, Pendle

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how long on average the Victims' Right to Review process took to reach a conclusion in (a) England, (b) each region and (c) each police area in each of the last five years.

Photo of Andrew Stephenson Andrew Stephenson Conservative, Pendle

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that reviews under the Victims' Right to Review process are concluded swiftly.

Photo of Andrew Stephenson Andrew Stephenson Conservative, Pendle

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what other types of complaint can be made by someone who has requested a review under the Victims' Right to Review process while that process is ongoing.

Photo of Brandon Lewis Brandon Lewis Minister of State (Home Office) (Policing and the Fire Service)

The Police ‘Victims' Right to Review’ scheme is non-statutory and was introduced by the National Police Chiefs’ Council in April 2015 in respect of charging decisions made by the police. It sits alongside the scheme introduced by the Crown Prosecution Service in June 2013 and works in a similar way.

Decisions under the police scheme are operational matters for police forces. As a result, the Home Office does not hold data on the operation of the scheme or issue guidance on its use.

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