Gcse

Department for Education written question – answered on 13th October 2016.

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Photo of Graham Brady Graham Brady Chair, Conservative Party 1922 Committee

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children achieved (a) five A* to C grade GCSEs including English and mathematics and (b) two or more A grades at A-level nationally; and what proportion of children achieved such grades in (i) selective, (ii) partially selective and (iii) comprehensive local education authority areas in the most recent year for which data is available.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

The proportion of students achieving two or more A grades at A level is not available.

The table below shows the number and percentage of pupils achieving five A* to C grade GCSEs including English and mathematics and the number and percentage of pupils achieving three or more A grades at A level for areas with different selection policies.

GCSE and equivalents

A level

Pupils at state funded schools at the end of key stage 4 2014/2015

Percentage of pupils achieving five A*-C grade GCSEs including English and mathematics

Students at the end of advance level study at state funded schools entered for at least one A level or applied single/double award A level 2014/15

Percentage of students achieving three or more A grades at A level or applied single/double level award

Fully selective areas1

47,258

60.6

20,085

14.0

Partially selective areas2

124,962

58.4

41,737

12.4

Non-selective areas

378,534

56.6

96,619

8.1

Source: KS4 & KS5 attainment data 2014/2015: final

Notes:

1. Includes schools in the following areas which operate area wide arrangements for academic selection: Bexley, Buckinghamshire, Kent, Lincolnshire, Medway, Slough, Southend, Sutton, Torbay and Trafford.

2. Includes schools in twenty-six local authorities that have selective schools operating their own arrangements for academic selection.

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No2 people think not

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