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Armed Forces: Vehicles

Ministry of Defence written question – answered on 4th March 2016.

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Photo of Emily Thornberry Emily Thornberry Shadow Secretary of State for Defence

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which types of (a) combat, (b) protected patrol and (c) reconnaissance vehicles in use by his Department were first brought into service in the (i) 1950s, (ii) 1960s, (iii) 1970s, (iv) 1980s and (v) 1990s.

Photo of Philip Dunne Philip Dunne Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Defence Procurement)

Details of combat, protected patrol (PPV) and reconnaissance vehicles procured in the 1950s to 1990s, that are still in use are provided below.

Vehicle Type

Vehicle

Decade brought into service

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

Combat

Challenger 2 Main Battle Tank

Yes

Combat

Warrior Infantry Fighting Vehicle

Yes

Combat

BULLDOG Armoured Personnel Carrier (FV 432)[1]

Yes

Combat

Bandvagn 206 (BV 206)

Yes

Combat

Artillery System 90 (AS 90)

Yes

PPV

SNATCH Land Rover[2]

Yes

Reconnaissance

Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked)

Yes

Reconnaissance

Weapons Mounted Installation Kit Land Rover (WMIK)[3]

Yes

[1] BULLDOG is based on the FV432 Mk2 hull which entered service in the 1980s. The FV432 Mk1 entered service in the 1960s and was replaced by the Mk2. The FV432 Mk1 is no longer in service.

[2] Snatch 1 was procured in the 1990s. In the 2000s Snatch I was upgraded and extensively refurbished to a number of build standards (Snatch 2, 2A and 2B) which remain in-service in a variety of roles.

[3] The first WMIK’s were procured in the 1990s. Additional WMIKs were procured in the 2000s to provide a reconnaissance capability. All in-service WMIKs have been upgraded and refurbished to a new build standard.

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