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Reoffenders

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 4th March 2016.

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Photo of Jo Stevens Jo Stevens Shadow Minister (Justice), Shadow Solicitor General

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners serving life sentences have been recalled to custody in each year since 2005.

Photo of Jo Stevens Jo Stevens Shadow Minister (Justice), Shadow Solicitor General

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what average number of months life-sentenced prisoners who were recalled to custody in the last five years spent in prison before they were re-released.

Photo of Andrew Selous Andrew Selous Assistant Whip (HM Treasury), The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

The information you have requested in respect of the number of indeterminate sentence prisoners (ie those prisoners serving a life sentence or an indeterminate sentence of Imprisonment for Public Protection - IPP) who have been recalled in each year since 2005 is available in the Ministry of Justice’s offender management quarterly statistical bulletin. This can be found using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

We are unable to provide the data on the average amount of time indeterminate sentence prisoners spend in custody following recall and before their re-release. Whilst this information is held on individual case files, the NOMS electronic case management system is unable to provide a report on the average period of time spent. In order to provide an answer it would be necessary to undertake a manual exercise looking at the case records of all indeterminate sentence prisoners during this period. Such an exercise would incur disproportionate costs.

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