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Social Security Benefits: Appeals

Ministry of Justice written question – answered on 14th January 2016.

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Photo of Debbie Abrahams Debbie Abrahams Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length was of a social security appeal heard by an appeals tribunal in each year from 2010-11 to date.

Photo of Debbie Abrahams Debbie Abrahams Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the length was of the longest social security appeal heard by an appeals tribunal for appeals lodged in each year from 2010-11 to date.

Photo of Shailesh Vara Shailesh Vara The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice, The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

The First-tier TribunalSocial Security and Child Support (SSCS) administered by HM Courts & Tribunals Service, hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions’ decisions on a range of benefits.

1. Information about the timeliness of SSCS appeals is published by the Ministry of Justice in the Tribunals and Gender Recognition Certificate Statistics Quarterly. The data requested can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics.

2. The following table provides the age in weeks of the oldest case cleared at a tribunal hearing in the years 2010/11 to 2014/15[1]:

Year

Age of the oldest case disposed of

2009-10

394

2010-11

320

2011-12

431

2012-13

649

2013-14

362

2014-15

331

A number of factors can influence the time it takes for an appeal to reach final conclusion. In particular, these data include the total elapsed time for cases which were heard, appealed to the Upper Tribunal, and subsequently reheard at the First-tier Tribunal. The age of one case at clearance in any one year does not reflect the experience of the vast majority of appellants.

[1] The age of the oldest case disposed of in the period April to September 2015 (the latest period for which statistics have been published) has not been included as this only reflects a part-year.

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