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Bovine Tuberculosis

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs written question – answered on 14th September 2015.

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Photo of Julian Knight Julian Knight Conservative, Solihull

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the remains of badgers killed on roads are routinely tested for the presence of bovine tuberculosis.

Photo of George Eustice George Eustice The Minister of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Badgers killed on roads in England are not routinely tested for the presence of bovine tuberculosis, as to do so would not be cost effective. The Animal and Plant Health Agency does, however, carry out targeted testing of dead badgers around bovine tuberculosis outbreaks of unknown origin in the Low Risk Area.

Testing of badgers between 1998 and 2005 via the Randomised Badger Culling Trial and road traffic accident surveys provided evidence of the typical prevalence of TB in badgers in areas of high incidence of TB in cattle. TB was found in around one third of all badgers in these areas.

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