Animal Experiments: Primates

Ministry of Defence written question – answered on 2nd July 2015.

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Photo of Kevan Jones Kevan Jones Shadow Minister (Defence)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2015 to Question 3597, what the reason was for each of the 67 experiments conducted on non-human primates in 2014.

Photo of Kevan Jones Kevan Jones Shadow Minister (Defence)

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2015 to Question 3596, which specific species of non-human primates have been experimented on by his Department in 2014; and how many such experiments have been performed on each such species.

Photo of Philip Dunne Philip Dunne Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Defence Procurement)

In common with other animal species used, the following list encapsulates categories of use: regulatory testing; medical countermeasures to biological agents; medical countermeasures to chemical agents; provision of tissue; hazard assessment; treatment and decontamination of chemical agents; medical management and surgical care; detection and identification of biological weapons.

All procedures were on just the one species, namely the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

Dstl Porton Down conducts less than half of one per cent of the animal experimentation carried out in the UK.

Dstl is proud of its work to develop and create battle-winning technology and protection equipment for UK Forces and Government through the best use of science and technology. The remit for Dstl to provide safe and effective protective measures for the UK and its Armed Forces against the threat posed by chemical and biological weapons and to enhance the treatment of conventional casualties on the battlefield, could not currently be achieved without the use of animals.

Each procedure is undertaken in strict accordance with the terms of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986; and Dstl fully embraces the principles of the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction and Refinement). Dstl Porton Down is licensed to conduct research involving animals by the Home Office.

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