Marine Accident Investigation Branch

Department for Transport written question – answered on 11th March 2015.

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Photo of Katy Clark Katy Clark Labour, North Ayrshire and Arran

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time was for the Maritime Accident Investigation Branch to publish a report into the causes of maritime accidents or incidents in each year from 1990 to date.

Photo of John Hayes John Hayes Minister of State (Department for Transport)

MAIB reports are published at the earliest opportunity to ensure that safety lessons can be applied as soon after an accident as possible. All investigations are different with complex cases requiring more time, so average reporting times can be misleading. The recent grounding of the Hoegh Osaka in the Solent, and the tragic loss of eight seafarers when the Cemfjord sank in the Pentland Firth are two recent examples that demonstrate this. Where urgent safety lessons are identified at any time during an investigation the Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents can issue a Safety Bulletin containing recommendations.

The average length of time between the date of the accident to the date of the publication of MAIB’s report for each of the years is:

1990

No accident investigation reports published

1991

25.5 months

1992

17.3 months

1993

16.5 months

1994

21 months

1995

16.3 months

1996

16.9 months

1997

16.9 months

1998

18.8 months

1999

10.1 months

2000

11.4 months

2001

10.3 months

2002

11.9 months

2003

10.4 months

2004

7.1 months

2005

10.2 months

2006

8.2 months

2007

8.6 months

2008

8 months

2009

8.5 months

2010

8.7 months

2011

8.9 months

2012

9.3 months

2013

10.8 months

2014

10.1 months

2015 to date

10.7 months

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