Dementia: Nurses

Department of Health written question – answered on 17th March 2015.

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Photo of Baroness Pinnock Baroness Pinnock Liberal Democrat

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many Admiral Nurses are employed in each of the local authority districts in England; and how that relates to the numbers of individuals suffering from dementia in those areas.

Photo of Baroness Pinnock Baroness Pinnock Liberal Democrat

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have for increasing the numbers of Admiral Nurses to ensure that all individuals with dementia, and their families, have access to the support provided by those nurses.

Photo of Earl Howe Earl Howe The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health

There are many models of supporting people with dementia and their families. Admiral Nurses are one model of care and there are other models such as peer support and services offered by other voluntary sector organisations.

The Department does not collect statistics over how many Admiral Nurses are employed in each of the local authority districts in England.

Decisions on Admiral Nurses are made at a local level by health and social care commissioners determining the services to best meet the needs of their local population.

On 21 February 2015, the Prime Minister announced the launch of his new Challenge on Dementia towards 2020. This set out to build on the achievements of the Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia 2012-2015. It aims to identify what needs to be done to make sure that dementia care, support, awareness and research are transformed by 2020.

In the Challenge on Dementia 2020, the Government set key aspirations aimed at improving quality and level of care:

- every person diagnosed with dementia having meaningful care following their diagnosis, which supports them and those around them, with meaningful care being in accordance with published National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards;

- carers of people with dementia are to be made aware of and offered the opportunity for respite, education, training, emotional and psychological support so that they feel able to cope with their caring responsibilities and to have a life alongside caring; and

- people with dementia and their carers receiving information on what post-diagnosis services are available locally and how these can be accessed, through for example an annual ‘information prescription’.

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