Strokes

Department of Health written question – answered on 23rd February 2015.

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Photo of Helen Jones Helen Jones Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what funding is provided from government sources for research into (a) intracerebral haemorrhage and (b) subarachnoid haemorrhage.

Photo of Helen Jones Helen Jones Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what stroke research projects receive funding from (a) his Department and (b) other government sources.

Photo of George Freeman George Freeman The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health

The Department’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funds extensive research on stroke and spent £26.3 million in this area in 2013/14.

Details of research projects funded through programmes managed by the NIHR, including projects relating to stroke, can be found on the NIHR website at:

http://www.nihr.ac.uk/research/programme-studies.htm

Details of current and completed research training and career development awards funded by the NIHR, including awards relating to stroke, can be found on the NIHR website at:

http://www.nihr.ac.uk/research/career-development-awards-funded.htm

Details of stroke research studies hosted by the NIHR Clinical Research Network can be found on the UK Clinical Research Network portfolio database at:

http://england.ukcrn.org.uk/Portfolio.aspx?Level1=6

Details of current and recent research projects relating to stroke funded by Research Councils and Innovate UK can be found on the Research Councils UK Gateway to Research available at:

http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk

The Medical Research Council (MRC) spends around £4.1 million a year on research into stroke.

Projects recently funded by the MRC include research at the University of Birmingham into the use of motorised jointed levers attached to the patient’s arm or hand to improve upper limb function in stroke survivors, research at University College London on language impairment and recovery after stroke, and research at the University of Edinburgh into how the function of the protein TREM-2 influences the balance between toxic and protective inflammation that occurs as a result of stroke.

Some Government-funded projects in stroke have relevance to intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).

The NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme is funding a £2.5 million trial of tranexamic acid for hyperacute primary ICH, and a £1.3 million surgical trial in traumatic ICH.

The NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre has a research sub-theme on acute vascular syndromes including SAH.

The MRC is funding research in Oxford investigating the genetic contribution to ICH. This project uses the China Kadoorie Biobank study of 0.5 million people to investigate 5,000 confirmed cases of ICH and 10,000 controls, in order to identify genetic variants linked to ICH.

The MRC is also funding research in Oxford investigating the impact of early brain injury on outcomes after SAH using magnetic resonance imaging, and in Manchester investigating how to reduce the incidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia following SAH.

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