NHS: Drugs

Department of Health written question – answered on 29th January 2015.

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Photo of Simon Burns Simon Burns Conservative, Chelmsford

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much the NHS spent on (a) all drugs, (b) cancer drugs and (c) drugs funded through the Cancer Drug Fund in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Photo of George Freeman George Freeman The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health

Figures provided for Primary Care for total drug spend are the total of net ingredient cost (NIC) and for Secondary Care the cost of the medicines at NHS list price.

Cost of drugs in primary and secondary care, England: 2009-10 to 2013-14

Total drugs

Cost (£ million)

Primary Care1

Secondary Care2

Total

2009-10

8,621.4

3,890.8

12,512.2

2010-11

8,881.1

4,173.9

13,055.0

2011-12

8,778.0

4,497.6

13,275.5

2012-13

8,439.0

5,020.8

13,459.8

2013-14

8,703.2

5,780.6

14,483.8

Sources: Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA), IMS HEALTH: Hospital Pharmacy Audit

Cost of cancer drugs3 in primary and secondary care, England: 2009-10 to 2013-14

Total drugs

Cost (£ million)

Primary Care1,4

Secondary Care2

Total

2009-10

230.2

748.1

978.3

2010-11

228.2

846.1

1,074.3

2011-12

190.0

964.1

1,154.1

2012-13

142.0

1,119.6

1,261.6

2013-14

143.0

1,350.2

1,493.2

Sources: PCA, IMS HEALTH: Hospital Pharmacy Audit

Spend through the Cancer Drugs Fund between October 2010 and March 2014

Year

Spend (£000’s)

2010-11 (Q3 and Q4)

38,254

2011-12

108,327

2012-13

175,334

2013-14

230,539

Source: Prior to April 2013, information supplied to the Department by strategic health authorities. From April 2013, information supplied by NHS England.

Notes:

1 Primary Care NIC is the basic cost of the drug, which does not take account of discounts, dispensing costs, fees or prescription charges income.

2 Secondary care cost is the cost of the medicines at NHS list price which may not reflect the price the hospital paid.

3 Cancer drugs are defined by British National Formulary Sections 8.1 Cytotoxic drugs,

8.2.3 Anti-lymphocyte monoclonal antibodies (but also used in other indications), 8.2.4 Other immunomodulating drugs (Interferon-Alfa, Aldesleukin, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (B.C.G.), Lenalidomide, Pomalidomide, Thalidomide and Mifamurtide only), and 8.3 Sex hormones and hormone antagonists in malignant disease.

4 The main reason for the reduction in cancer drugs in Primary Care is the introduction of lower cost generic formulations.

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