Social Security Benefits: Brighton

Work and Pensions written question – answered on 6th September 2013.

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Photo of Caroline Lucas Caroline Lucas Green, Brighton, Pavilion

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

(1) what proportion of applications for employment and support allowance made by residents of Brighton and Hove unitary authority area were rejected on the basis of the findings of a work capability assessment in (a) the latest period for which figures are available and (b) the preceding period; and what proportion of such decisions were (i) reversed and (ii) upheld on appeal;

(2) what proportion of incapacity benefit reassessment applications made by residents of Brighton and Hove unitary authority area were rejected on the basis of the findings of a work capability assessment in (a) the latest period for which figures are available and (b) the preceding period; and what proportion of such decisions were (i) reversed and (ii) upheld on appeal.

Photo of Mark Hoban Mark Hoban The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

Statistics on what proportion of applications for employment and support allowance made by residents of Brighton and Hove unitary authority area that were rejected on the basis of the findings of a work capability assessment and what proportion of such decisions were (i) reversed and (ii) upheld on appeal from 27 October 2008 to 31 May 2012 have been placed in the Library.

Statistics on what proportion of incapacity benefit reassessment applications made by residents of Brighton and Hove unitary authority area that were rejected on the basis of the findings of a work capability assessment from 27 October 2008 to 31 May 2012 can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-work-pensions/series/employment-and-support-allowance-outcomes-of-work-capability-assessment

Information on what proportion of such decisions were (i) reversed and (ii) upheld on appeal is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

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