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Burglary

Justice written question – answered on 19th October 2012.

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Photo of Sadiq Khan Sadiq Khan Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice, Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice

(1) what the 12-month reconviction rate was for each type of sentence for those found guilty of domestic burglary in each year since 1994;

(2) what the average number of reconvictions per offender was of those found guilty of domestic burglary in each year since 1994;

(3) how many people found guilty of committing burglary went on to commit (a) no more crimes, (b) between one and five crimes, (c) between six and 10 crimes, (d) between 11 and 20 crimes and (e) more than 20 crimes in each year since 1994;

(4) what the 12-month reconviction rate was of those found guilty of domestic burglary in each year since 1994.

Photo of Helen Grant Helen Grant The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Women and Equalities

Table 1 presents the number of adult (aged 18 or over) and juvenile (aged 10 to 17) offenders in England and Wales released from custody, receiving a non-custodial conviction at court, caution reprimand or warning in each of the years 2000, 2002 to 2009 (the latest calendar year available) after being found guilty of domestic burglary. Also presented are the proven re-offending rates (i.e. the proportion of the offenders found guilty of domestic burglary who re-offended in a one year follow up period) and the average number of re-offences per offender.

2000 is the earliest year for which proven re-offending data exist on a comparable basis and data are not available for 2001 due to a problem with archived data on Court Orders. Data for 2010 will be published on 25 October 2012.

Table 2 is a further breakdown of table 1 showing re-offending rates by the type of sentence received by those found guilty of domestic burglary. Re-offending rates by sentence type should not be compared to assess the effectiveness of sentences, as there is no control for known differences in offender characteristics.

It is not possible to provide a breakdown of all re-offences committed by these offenders to date because re-offending data are based on a one year follow up period. However, for your information, Table 3 presents those offenders found guilty of burglary which includes domestic and other burglary offences and the number of re-offences they committed in a one-year follow-up period.

Proven re-offending is defined as any offence committed in a one-year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand or warning in the one- year follow-up period or a further six month waiting period to allow cases to progress through the courts.

Table 1: Proven re-offending rates of offenders found guilty of domestic burglary
  2000 2002 2003 2004 200S 2006 2007 2008 2009
Adult offenders                  
Proportion of offenders who re-offend (%) 58.0 58.5 55.0 52.5 50.0 48.0 49.1 50.6 47.4
Average number of re-offences per offender (frequency rate) 2.37 2.40 2.09 1.94 1.73 1.50 1.62 1.60 1.43
Number of offenders in cohort 8,091 7,455 7,686 7,125 6,819 6,784 7.309 7,594 7,248
                   
Juvenile offenders                  
Proportion of offenders who re-offend (%) 47.1 46.8 47.7 47.6 47.1 48.4 46.0 49.1 49.9
Average number of re-offences per offender {frequency rate) 1.88 1.82 1.82 1.73 1.66 1.74 1.67 1.71 1.67
Number of offenders in cohort 3,620 3,268 3,106 3,124 3,266 3,333 3,209 2,817 2,776
Note: Data is not available for 2001 due to a problem with archived data on Court Orders.
Table 2: Proven re-offending rates of offenders found guilty of domestic burglary by type of sentence received
  Index disposal 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Adults Absolute discharge (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1)
  Caution 22.4 21.6 27.1 23.2 26.3 26.2 27.6 25.2 25.3
  Conditional discharge 35.9 39.1 37.3 31.1 43.9 31.4 26.3 24.7 26.2
  Court orders 46.3 53.8 51.4 51.5 48.9 46.3 48.1 48.7 41.4
  Fines 0.0 39.1 43.9 36.1 25.9 43.9 33.9 20.4 (1)
  Prison 37.1 64.2 60.7 57.5 56.1 55.8 55.9 58.7 56.1
  Other 37.0 35.7 33.7 27.4 41.2 29.3 28.1 18.4 19.7
                     
Juveniles First tier penalty 47.8 42.0 44.0 41.7 42.9 43.6 41.4 39.3 41.6
  Prison 78.9 78.4 82.3 83.2 80.3 81.1 82.4 84.0 83.1
  Youth Community penalty 57.9 64.3 68 3 68.0 68.0 69.9 66.1 69.4 68.6
  Youth Pre-court Disposal 28.6 27.1 29 5 31.3 31.2 33.8 28.9 30.5 30.6
  Youth—Other 51.8 56.9 71.4 66.0 68.9 69.4 62.5 62.9 57.5
(1) Data based on less than 30 offenders or offences are removed as they make data unreliable for interpretation. Note: Data is not available for 2001 due to a problem with archived data on Court Orders.
Table 3: Number of re-offences committed in the one year follow up period by offenders found guilty of burglary
  Year No re-offences 1 to 5 re-offences 6 to 10 re-offences 11 to 20 re-offences 21 and over re-offences
Adults 2000 6,547 6,053 1,547 482 (1)27
  2002 5,972 5,769 1,548 509 (1)29
  2003 6,160 5,850 1,387 441 (1)30
  2004 6,040 5,379 1,201 325 (1)17
  2005 6,286 5,050 1,003 253 (1)12
  2006 6,809 5,275 854 208 (1)17
  2007 7,124 5,742 991 236 (1)14
  2008 7,105 6,022 885 227 (1)19
  2009 7,179 5,573 786 185 (1)12
             
Juveniles 2000 5,547 3,119 603 240 (1)25
  2002 4,883 2.746 1,335 208 (1)24
  2003 4,445 2,599 514 193 (1)8
  2004 4,194 2,600 449 148 (1)18
  2005 4,542 2,750 455 131 (1)12
  2006 4,691 3,006 466 159 (1)11
  2007 4,537 2,732 448 136 (1)8
  2008 3,657 2,367 374 96 (1)7
  2009 3,163 2,070 330 88 (1)7
(1) Less than 30 offenders—treat data with caution. Note: Data is not available for 2001 due to a problem with archived data on Court Orders.

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