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Population

Cabinet Office written question – answered on 18th October 2012.

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Photo of Nicholas Soames Nicholas Soames Conservative, Mid Sussex

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of the increase in the UK population between 2001 and 2011, as reported in the recent census, was due to net foreign immigration in that period plus (a) the children subsequently born in the UK to those immigrants and (b) all children born in the UK in the same period to all foreign born mothers.

Photo of Nick Hurd Nick Hurd The Parliamentary Secretary, Cabinet Office, The Parliamentary Secretary, Cabinet Office

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated October 2012

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what proportion of the increase in the UK population between 2001 and 2011, as reported in the recent census, was due to net foreign immigration in that period plus (a) the children subsequently born in the UK to those immigrants and (b) all children born in the UK in the same period to all foreign born mothers (123518).

The exact information requested, on the proportion of the increase in the UK population between 2001 and 2011 that was due to net foreign immigration, is not available. While ONS has released the first set of census estimates for England and Wales, UK estimates will not be available until all of the census offices have published the necessary data. At time of writing, this is expected to be December 2012.

The recent census release identified that approximately 56 per cent of the increase in the population of England and Wales between 2001 and 2011 was due to net migration. However, this is only a proxy for net foreign immigration as it will include both UK born migrants and moves between England and Wales and the other UK constituent countries.

ONS is due to revise population estimates for England and Wales for the period between 2001 and 2011 to reflect the results of the 2011 Census. This will include an estimate of the population change that is due to net international migration, which is a better proxy for net foreign immigration as it will not include moves made between England and Wales and the other UK countries. However, these estimates will not be available until December 2012.

During the 10-year period from 2001 to 2010 inclusive, there were 1,411,519 live births in England and Wales to mothers born outside the UK (21.4 per cent of all live births in England and Wales during this period). Figures for live births where the mother is non-UK born are compiled from birth registration data. Information on country of birth of mothers is provided by the informant at registration.

It is not possible to identify the number of children subsequently born in the UK to immigrants who arrived between 2001 and 2010 as information on year of mothers' arrival in the UK is not collected at birth registration. This means that it is not possible to distinguish between (i) births to mothers who were born outside the UK and migrated to the UK between 2001 and 2010 and (ii) births to mothers born outside the UK who migrated to the UK prior to 2001.

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