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Burglary

Justice written question – answered on 15th October 2012.

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Photo of Sadiq Khan Sadiq Khan Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice, Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the reoffending rates have been of people convicted of household burglary over the last five years.

Photo of Jeremy Wright Jeremy Wright The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice

Table 1 shows the number of offenders in England and Wales who were convicted of household burglary and either released from custody or received a non-custodial conviction at court in each of the years 2005 to 2009 (the latest calendar year available). The re-offending rates for these offenders, i.e. the proportion that committed a proven reoffence within a one-year follow-up period is also shown. Reoffending rates for 2010 will be published on 25 October 2012.

Table l: Re-offending rate of offenders who were convicted of household burglary(1) and released from custody or received a non-custodial conviction at court in 2005-09
  Number of offenders Proportion of offenders who re-offend (%)
2005 8,180 53.6
2006 7,847 53.1
2007 8,529 52.9
2008 8,750 54.5
2009 8,575 51.6
(1) Includes offences under sections 9 and 10 of the Theft Act 1968: Burglary in a dwelling with intent to commit an offence; Burglary in a dwelling with violence or the threat of violence; Other burglary in a dwelling; Aggravated burglary in a dwelling (including attempts).

Proven reoffending is defined as any offence committed in a one-year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand or warning in the one- year follow-up. Following this one-year period, a further six-month waiting period is allowed for cases to progress through the courts.

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