Young Offenders: Offences Against Children

Justice written question – answered on 2nd July 2012.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Andrew Turner Andrew Turner Conservative, Isle of Wight

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many children aged (a) under 16 and (b) between 16 and 18 have been convicted of a sexual offence against a child in (i) the smallest area for which figures are available and (ii) England.

Photo of Crispin Blunt Crispin Blunt Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice) (Prisons and Probation)

The number of defendants aged 10 to 15 and 16 to 18 found guilty at all courts for sexual offences against a child, by police force area in England, for 2011, can be viewed in the following table.

Defendants aged 10 to 15 and 16 to 18 found guilty at all courts for ‘Sexual offences against a child (1) , by police force area, England, 2011 (2, 3)
Force 10 to 15 16 to 18
Avon and Somerset 7 4
Bedfordshire 1
Cambridgeshire 1 5
Cheshire 5 2
Cleveland 2 1
Cumbria 1 6
Derbyshire 2 6
Devon and Cornwall 1 9
Dorset 1 4
Durham 8 5
Essex 2 2
Gloucestershire 1 1
Greater Manchester 15 17
Hampshire 7 6
Hertfordshire 1 5
Humberside 1 1
Kent 5
Lancashire 5 16
Leicestershire 1 1
Lincolnshire 1 2
Merseyside 5 8
Metropolitan Police 27 25
Norfolk 3 4
North Yorkshire 2 7
Northamptonshire 1 7
Northumbria 4 9
Nottinghamshire 2 5
South Yorkshire 4 2
Staffordshire 1 4
Suffolk 2 2
Surrey 1 3
Sussex 3 9
Thames Valley 6 7
Warwickshire 2 1
West Mercia 3 8
West Midlands 4 8
West Yorkshire 3 12
Wiltshire 1 1
Total England 136 221
(1) Offences include: Sexual assault on male/female aged under 13, rape or attempted rape against a male/female aged under 16, sexual activity involving a child, familial sexual offences, abuse of children through prostitution and pornography, abuse of a position of trust, sexual grooming, taking, making or possessing indecent photographs of children. (2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services: Ministry of Justice.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes1 person thinks so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.